2010/11 Baycrest and Baycrest Foundation Annual Report


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2010/11 ANNUAL REPORT NOW IS THE TIME TO TRANSFORM THE FUTURE BUILDING THE FUTURE OF AGING INTRODUCING BAYCREST HEALTH SCIENCES TEACHING AND LEARNING IN THE NEXT GENERATION INNOVATION ENGINE BRINGING GREAT IDEAS TO LIFE BAYCREST BOARD OF DIRECTORS, BOARD OF GOVERNORS, EXECUTIVE TEAM AND MEDICAL STAFF BAYCREST FINANCIAL SUMMARY NOW IS THE TIME TO SUPPORT THE FUTURE

TEACHING AND LEARNING IN THE NEXT GENERATION

New strategy strengthens Baycrest's commitment to education excellence

A growing need for expertise in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of age-related disorders is challenging health-care systems worldwide.

The statistics tell the story. Today, some 4.8 million Canadians are 65 or older, a number expected to grow to 10.4 million by 2036. Yet we currently rely on fewer than 300 geriatricians, 200 geriatric psychiatrists and an insufficient number of family physicians trained in geriatric medicine to provide the specialized knowledge and expertise demanded by this global demographic shift.

Baycrest is responding to this challenge head on. Under a new five-year strategic plan, we are organizing and integrating the different components of our education enterprise into The Centre for Education and Knowledge Exchange in Aging. A key goal of the plan is to recruit and train the best and the brightest and encourage them to focus their practice on the older adult.

Canadians getting older

Baycrest is already home to the greatest number of trainees of any leading institution focused on aging. Each year, more than 800 students from 24 universities and colleges are trained in a wide variety of health disciplines on our campus. More than 200 members of our staff have academic appointments. We host a number of provincial, national and international educational programs each year, and we are an emerging hub for global tele-education in aging, collaborating with close to 50 institutions around the world. We also provide educational programs for staff, clients, families and caregivers, as well as the general public.

The Centre for Education and Knowledge Exchange in Aging brings all of these endeavours together, providing infrastructure and co-ordination, and supporting both educators and learners.

Through the establishment of a state-of-the-art learning simulation lab and recruitment of educational researchers and clinician educators, the Centre will enable Baycrest scientists and clinicians – together with our collaborators and partners – to communicate breakthroughs and discoveries across the province and beyond; teach trainees, patients and families about the latest knowledge regarding seniors' care; and provide consultation services to organizations in need.

Educational excellence is a strategic priority at Baycrest, notes Dr. David Conn, vice-president of Education and medical director of the Mood and Related Disorders Clinic. "In the first phase of implementing our new strategic plan, we are looking at enhancing the student experience here, and asking how are we doing with our students and trainees [in geriatric medicine and psychiatry, and family practice with additional training in the care of the elderly]. We have to be sure we don't just give them
a good experience, but a wonderful experience so that they will want to stay in geriatrics."

Now more closely integrated with clinical care and research, education is a key component of the new Baycrest Health Sciences model introduced this year. The Centre for Education and Knowledge Exchange in Aging provides a vital bridge for translating knowledge into clinical practice. "How do you move knowledge from basic research to the bedside? How does it actually get there? You do it with education and the right kind of education, actually helping people to change the way they practice, based on new discoveries in research," says Dr. Conn.

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