Research

Funding from donors and grant agencies aids our scientists in pursuing innovative research projects to improve understanding of the brain and develop interventions for healthy aging.

Scientists received generous support from many donors this past year including Leonard and Micki Moore Simpson, the Rotman family, Barrie Rose and Karen Solomon and family, Robert and Mona Sherkin, the Tanenbaum family and the estate of David Durbin.

Below are a few of the grants received by our researchers and the projects supported this past year.

  • Dr. Jean Chen received support from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research to develop non-invasive brain-imaging techniques tailored towards older adults. These are expected to alert doctors earlier to a person’s risk of developing certain brain diseases.
  • Dr. Brian Levine received support from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research to examine how differences in memory ability might relate to memory changes during aging and neurodegenerative diseases.
  • Dr. Deirdre Dawson received support from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention that could help older adults preserve their independence for longer.
  • Dr. Brian Levine received support from the Heart and Stroke Foundation to convert his rehabilitation program into a web-based training program that can be delivered remotely to stroke patients.
  • Dr. Jed Meltzer received support from the Heart and Stroke Foundation to test the effectiveness of brain stimulation on stroke patients. This will will help in the development of a quick evaluation of a variety of interventions, such as drugs, brain stimulation and therapy.
  • Dr. Raquel Meyer and Jennifer Reguindin received support from the Canadian Centre for Brain Health and Aging (CC-ABHI) to help healthcare workers better learn to detect and communicate acute deterioration in older adults with dementia. Their SOS gamified educational app is one element in a multipronged approach to help avoid or reduce unnecessary emergency department visits. Seed funding was generously provided by Glenn and Tracie Graff, SIM-One and the Government of Ontario.
  • Dr. Kelly Murphy received support from the Canadian Centre for Brain Health and Aging (CC-ABHI) to improve access and educate healthcare professionals around the world on Baycrest’s Learning the Ropes program. This program helps patients with mild cognitive impairment optimize their cognitive health.