History

1913

1913

"We can't have our old folks sleeping in the park. Go knock door-to-door...
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1913
1918

1918

Baycrest's forerunner, the Toronto Jewish Old Folks Home, opens at 29 Cecil Street in downtown Toronto
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1918
1920

1920s-1930s

Three adjacent houses are purchased and the home now cares for 75 residents.
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1920
1948

1948

A 25-acre tract of land is purchased to build a new home for the aged and hospital on Bathurst Street
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1948
1953

1953

The Atkinson Foundation provides a grant of $100,000 to design Canada's first comprehensive geriatric medical program
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1953
1954

1954

Residents move to a combined Jewish Home for the Aged and Baycrest Hospital on Bathurst Street - a first in Ontario
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1954
1955

1955

Dora Till - Founding President, Women's Auxiliary (1955)
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1955
1956

1956

Sam Ruth, a pioneer in health-care administration, becomes Baycrest's chief executive officer, a position he holds until 1980.
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1956
1959

1959

Baycrest Community Day Centre for Seniors is introduced - the first of its kind in Ontario
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1959
1962

1962

Construction Begins at the New Jewish Home for the Aged, c. 1962.
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1962
1963

1963

Dr. Wulf Grobin embarks on a 30-year study showing diabetes and the need for anti-diabetic medication...
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1963
1964

1964

Dr. Henry Himel - Physician-in-Chief (1964-1977)
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1964
1967

1967

The organization is officially incorporated as Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care
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1967
1968

1968

The new Jewish Home for the Aged, Abe and Elsie Posluns Building opens and Baycrest Hospital occupies the old building
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1968
1969

Late 1960s

"Traditionally, the continuum of care has been viewed as a straight line, starting in the community...
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1969
1970

1970

An acute care unit opens - the first to be approved in a chronic care hospital
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1970
1976

1976

The Terraces of Baycrest, an assisted living residence for seniors, is built on the Baycrest campus.
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1976
1977

1977

The Joseph E. and Minnie Wagman Centre, a recreational complex for seniors, opens next door to the Terraces.
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1977
1983

1983

The first Behavioural Neurology Unit in Canada opens in Baycrest Hospital to serve patients with dementia...
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1983
1986

1986

The new Baycrest Hospital, Ben and Hilda Katz Building, is the only geriatric hospital in Canada
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1986
1987

1987

The Samuel Lunenfeld Mountainview Club is a new day program...
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1987
1988

1988

Baycrest is a founding partner in Metro Toronto's Regional Geriatric Program, an outreach service for older people living at home
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1988
1989

1989

The new Rotman Research Institute recruits top scientists to collaborate on research...
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1989
1989

1989

Baycrest is formally affiliated as an academic centre of the University of Toronto...
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1989
1991

1991

"The Rotman Research Institute promises to be one of the premier institutions in the world...
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1991
1992

1992

Memory expert Dr. Endel Tulving joins the Rotman Research Institute to continue his groundbreaking work ...
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1992
1993

1993

"The culture of Baycrest is one that embraces a shared vision, teamwork, effective communication...
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1993
1994

1994

Rotman scientists use new Event-Related Potentials (ERP) technology to study neural activity in the brain
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1994
1995

1995

The Clinical Epidemiology and Evaluation Unit conducts long-term studies on health issues in aging and evaluates clinical programs
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1995
1996

1996

The Ben and Hilda Katz Centre for Gerontological Social Work at Baycrest...
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1996
1997

1997

Baycrest Home Care Services is formed to care for seniors in the community.
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1997
1998

1998

The Kunin-Lunenfeld Applied Research Unit is established to bring best practices to clinical care.
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1998
1999

1999

A study by Rotman scientist Dr. Randy McIntosh shows older adults perform just as well as young adults...
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1999
2000

2000

The new 472-bed Apotex Centre, Jewish Home for the Aged...
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2000
2001

2001

The Reuben Cipin Healthy Living Community (2 Neptune Dr.), a condominium-style life lease building, opens.
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2001
2002

2002

An Internet-based support program is developed for isolated seniors caring for spouses with dementia
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2002
2003

2003

Baycrest is a partner in Canada's first Centre for Stroke Recovery...
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2003
2004

2004

The Brain Health Centre Clinics provide out-patient care for mood, memory and stroke disorders...
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2004
2005

2005

A new state-of-the-art MRI scanner is added to other on-site brain imaging technology...
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2005
2006

2006

Baycrest leads an international project to develop the world's first functional, virtual brain...
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2006
2007

2007

The Elkie Adler MS Clinic opens.
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2007
2008

2008

"The Centre for Brain Fitness is created to develop products to improve brain health...
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2008
2009

2009

Baycrest and MaRS launch the for-profit company, Cogniciti, to develop and market brain fitness products...
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2009
2010

2010

The new Toronto Trans-generational Brain and Body Centre at Baycrest...
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2010
2011

2011

The Next Generation of Baycrest is an ambitious new plan to achieve Baycrest's goal...
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2011
2012

2012

May 9 –His Excellency Shimon Peres, President of Israel attends Brain Research Rountable, hosted by Baycrest Health Sciences.
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2012
2015

2015

Present year
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2015

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Milestones

The following milestones include quotes, research highlights and significant people to Baycrest.

1913
“We can’t have our old folks sleeping in the park. Go knock door-to-door. Tell the people what’s the matter and ask for donations!”
— Slova Greenberg, President, Ezras Noshem (“helping women”) Society

1918
Baycrest’s forerunner, the Toronto Jewish Old Folks Home, opens at 29 Cecil Street in downtown Toronto

1920s-1930s
Three adjacent houses are purchased and the home now cares for 75 residents. Part of the building is designated as a hospital with medical care donated by Jewish doctors

1948
A 25-acre tract of land is purchased to build a new home for the aged and hospital on Bathurst Street

1953
The Atkinson Foundation provides a grant of $100,000 to design Canada’s first comprehensive geriatric medical program

1954
Residents move to a combined Jewish Home for the Aged and Baycrest Hospital on Bathurst Street – a first in Ontario

The new Mount Sinai Hospital begins a four-week intern rotation at Baycrest – the first geriatric rotation of its kind in Canada, and probably in North America

Dr. Charles Markson – Baycrest’s first Physician-in-Chief (1954-1964)

1955
Dora Till – Founding President, Women’s Auxiliary (1955)

1956
Sam Ruth, a pioneer in health-care administration, becomes Baycrest’s chief executive officer, a position he holds until 1980

Sam Ruth – Baycrest CEO (1956-1980) – Founding President, Baycrest Foundation (1980-1988)

1959
Baycrest Community Day Centre for Seniors is introduced – the first of its kind in Ontario

1964
Dr. Henry Himel – Physician-in-Chief (1964-1977)

1963
Dr. Wulf Grobin embarks on a 30-year study showing diabetes and the need for anti-diabetic medication can be curtailed through diet, exercise and weight control.

1967
The organization is officially incorporated as Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care

1968
The new Jewish Home for the Aged, Abe and Elsie Posluns Building opens and Baycrest Hospital occupies the old building

Late 1960s
“Traditionally, the continuum of care has been viewed as a straight line, starting in the community, proceeding through the general hospital and ending in the nursing home. To be fully developed, it must be viewed as a dynamic circle.”
– Sam Ruth, Baycrest CEO, and Stephen Rudin, Hospital Administrator

1970
An acute care unit opens – the first to be approved in a chronic care hospital

1976
The Terraces of Baycrest, an assisted living residence for seniors, is built on the Baycrest campus

1977
The Joseph E. and Minnie Wagman Centre, a recreational complex for seniors, opens next door to the Terraces

1983
The first Behavioural Neurology Unit in Canada opens in Baycrest Hospital to serve patients with dementia
The Board of Directors identifies research and education in aging as part of Baycrest’s mandate

1986
The new Baycrest Hospital, Ben and Hilda Katz Building, is the only geriatric hospital in Canada

1987
The Samuel Lunenfeld Mountainview Club is a new day program offering respite to families caring for seniors with cognitive disorders

1988
Baycrest is a founding partner in Metro Toronto’s Regional Geriatric Program, an outreach service for older people living at home

1989
Baycrest is formally affiliated as an academic centre of the University of Toronto
The new Rotman Research Institute recruits top scientists to collaborate on research into brain and behaviour changes in aging
Dr. Donald Stuss is appointed the first director of the Rotman Research Institute

1990
The on-site Esther Exton Child Care Centre opens for staff and the community

1991
“The Rotman Research Institute promises to be one of the premier institutions in the world for the study of brain-behaviour connections.”
— Dr. Jeffrey Cummings, University of California

1992
Memory expert Dr. Endel Tulving joins the Rotman Research Institute to continue his groundbreaking work with a focus on aging and memory disorders
Rotman Research Institute scientist and 2005 Gairdner International Award winner

1993
“The culture of Baycrest is one that embraces a shared vision, teamwork, effective communication, and a sincere commitment to quality. Client programs are innovative and there is documented evidence of exemplary care.”
— The report of the Canadian Council on Health Facilities Accreditation

“Baycrest is on the cutting edge of serving its community. The kind of technology I’ve seen here is designed to help people retain their independence, and that’s part of what we’re trying to achieve in our long-term care reforms.”
— Ruth Grier, Ontario Minister of Health

1994
Rotman scientists use new Event-Related Potentials (ERP) technology to study neural activity in the brain

1995
The Clinical Epidemiology and Evaluation Unit conducts long-term studies on health issues in aging and evaluates clinical programs

1996
The Ben and Hilda Katz Centre for Gerontological Social Work at Baycrest is the first university-affiliated social work research program located in a caregiving setting

1997
Baycrest Home Care Services is formed to provide in-home care to seniors in the community.
The Rotman Research Institute is ranked among the top five brain research centres in the world by an internationally recognized panel of scientists.

The Memory and Aging program helps seniors address normal memory problems.

“We owe our seniors the right to enjoy dignity and independence and comfort to the absolute best of our ability… I’m here today as Premier to acknowledge on behalf of all premiers who have gone before me, of all parties and of all stripes, that Baycrest has played a leading role on that front.”
— Ontario Premier Mike Harris at the groundbreaking for the Apotex Centre, Jewish Home for the Aged

1998
The Kunin-Lunenfeld Applied Research Unit is established to bring best practices to clinical care.

The joint Baycrest/University of Toronto Max and Gianna Glassman Chair in Neuropsychology is created

The Sandra A. Rotman Chair and Program in Neuropsychiatry is established.

1999
A study by Rotman scientist Dr. Randy McIntosh shows older adults perform just as well as young adults on visual, short-term memory tests, but that older adults use different parts of the brain.

2000
The new 472-bed Apotex Centre, Jewish Home for the Aged and The Louis and Leah Posluns Centre for Stroke and Cognition opens its doors.

The Baycrest-Kaplan Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (B-KANS) is developed at Baycrest and is now used around the world.

The Norman and Honey Schipper Chair in Gerontological Social Work at Baycrest and the University of Toronto is the first of its kind.

The Reva James Leeds Chair in Neuroscience and Research Leadership is created at Baycrest and U of T.
A study led by Rotman Research Institute Dr. Helen Mayberg, along with colleagues at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center, finds an important clue in the brain that may explain why some people respond better to anti-depressants than others.

2001
Seniors move into the Reuben Cipin Healthy Living Community (2 Neptune Dr.), a condominium-style life lease building.
The Al Hertz Family Foundation endows a Clinical Nurse Specialist in Pain Management, the first donor-supported position of its kind in Canada.

Baycrest holds the first of a series of international telehealth video conferences.

Magnetoencephalography (MEG) technology is added to study brain activity.

A study led by Rotman founding director Dr. Donald Stuss finds the strongest evidence yet that what sets humans apart from other primates may be found in the brain’s frontal lobes. It is the understanding of the mental processes of others that makes us human and gives rise to our capacity to feel empathy, sympathy, humour and even deception.

2002
An Internet-based support program is developed for isolated seniors caring for spouses with dementia

2003
Baycrest is a partner in Canada’s first Centre for Stroke Recovery, a virtual centre spearheaded by the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario.

The Sam and Ida Ross Memory Clinic, an out-patient service for seniors with memory disorders, is established with a record $10-million gift.

The Memory Link program trains people with amnesia to use hand-held electronic organizers to remain independent.

The Rotman Research Institute is “a premier international center for the study of human brain function. Rotman researchers have provided pioneering insights into the mechanisms of normal aging and neurological and psychiatric disease.”
— Report of an international team of scientists following a review of the RRI

2004
The innovative Brain Health Centre Clinics provides out-patient care for mood, memory and stroke disorders
A partnership with Sunnybrook and St. John’s Rehab creates the Neuroscience Alliance project, a continuum of care for victims of stroke.

Baycrest is the first long-term care facility in Canada to adopt Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) technology.

Baycrest On-Line Documentation (BOLD), an electronic health record system, is introduced
Caring for Aging Holocaust Survivors: A Practice Manual for health-care professionals, support staff and families is published.

An external review of the Kunin-Lunenfeld Applied Research Unit finds it “a unique centre in Canada and perhaps in North America”

Rotman scientist Cheryl Grady finds evidence that people with early Alzheimer’s can engage other areas of the brain to perform successfully on memory tests.

2005
A new state-of-the-art MRI scanner is added to other on-site brain imaging technology to permit cutting edge research of the human brain thanks to donor funding.

Baycrest scientists lead the international Brain Network Recovery Group (Brain NRG) studying the ability of brain networks to rewire after damage caused by stroke and dementia.

Rotman scientist Dr. Endul Tulving receives a 2005 Gairdner International Award, one of the world’s highest scientific honours, in recognition of his landmark research to distinguish different types of human memory.

A clinical-experimental study at the Rotman Institute using a new cognitive rehabilitation approach shows improvements in memory, practical task planning and psychosocial function.

A study led by Dr. Helen Mayberg, a senior Rotman scientist and the Sandra A. Rotman Chair in Neuro-psychiatry, is the first to surgically implant electrodes into the brains of severely depressed patients who had not responded to other treatments. Results show a “striking and sustained remission of depression.”

“You’re bringing hope into a particular area that seemed devoid of hope – that had become somewhat fatalistic. You are bringing hope to our families, our community and to the world.”
— Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty at the opening of the Brain Health Centre Clinics at Baycrest

2006
Baycrest leads an international project to develop the world’s first functional, virtual brain
The fully renovated Shirley and Philip Granovsky Palliative Care Unit admits its first patients

2007
The Elkie Adler MS Clinic opens.

A landmark Rotman study shows bilingualism has a protective effect in delaying the onset of dementia.

2008
“The Centre for Brain Fitness is created to develop products to improve brain health. “Our government is proud to support Baycrest and its invaluable work, which is already leading to the discovery of important new tools and approaches to treating brain diseases associated with aging.”
— Ontario Minister of Research and Innovation John Wilkinson on announcing $10 million in funding for the Centre for Brain Fitness

2009
Baycrest and MaRS launch the for-profit company, Cogniciti, to develop and market brain fitness products
Women of Baycrest is launched to raise $3 million for a Research Chair in Women’s Brain Health and Aging at Baycrest.

The Acute Care and Transition Unit (ACT) accepts community seniors to help reduce emergency room wait times and provide better care to older adults.

An international panel rates the Rotman Research Institute among the world’s top neuroscience programs.

2010
The new Toronto Trans-generational Brain and Body Centre at Baycrest will study the effects of genetics and the environment on health.

The new Charlotte and Lewis Steinberg Family Slow Stream Rehabilitation Unit offers longer stay, low intensity therapy to frail seniors.

A project with the University of Toronto will test using a social robot with residents who have mild to moderate cognitive impairment.

Baycrest is the first Meditech long-term care setting in Canada to adopt a centralized allergy management system.

Additional funding for the virtual brain project from the U.S.-based James S. McDonnell Foundation brings the total to $13.8 million.

The innovative BRAVO research study examines if volunteering can boost brain health for retirees.

2011
The Next Generation of Baycrest is an ambitious new plan to achieve Baycrest’s goal of becoming the global centre of excellence in brain health and aging.